Sam Fullbrook: ‘Delicate Beauty’ at Queensland Art Gallery

Last weekend I travelled to Brisbane to see the opening of a small survey of paintings by Australian artist Sam Fullbrook (1922 – 2004) at the Queensland Art Gallery.

This show of around 40 paintings and drawings wasn’t intended as a retrospective but rather a specific look at three areas of Fullbrook’s practice – landscape, portraits and the racetrack (a place Fullbrook seems to have spent quite a lot of time).

It’s a riotous explosion of colour in Gallery 14 at the QAG. If you’re interested in reading more about the show, you can find my full review and lots more images and links at The Guardian.

Below is one of Fullbrook’s well-known portraits, Brisbane writer Ernestine Hill.

The exhibition runs until 10 August 2014.

 

FULLBROOK, Sam Australia b.1922 d.2004 Ernestine Hill 1970 Oil on canvas 96.8 x 76.3cm Acc. 1:1193 Gift of the artist 1972
FULLBROOK, Sam Australia b.1922 d.2004 Ernestine Hill 1970 Oil on canvas 96.8 x 76.3cm Acc. 1:1193 Gift of the artist 1972

Margaret Olley Art Centre – a very crowded house!

A couple of weeks ago I was asked by The Guardian Australia to write a preview on the soon-to-open Margaret Olley Art Centre. The Centre provides a home for the studio of the late Australian artist Margaret Olley (1923 – 2011) – a space that’s incredibly been recreated at Tweed Regional Gallery in Murwillumbah.

I also spoke to Australian artist, Ben Quilty, a friend of the late artist about her life in art. Read the full story in The Guardian.

The photograph below was taken of Margaret Olley’s original home in Paddington by another of her friends, Steven Alderton.

Steven Alderton, Early Morning at Margaret Olley's Home 2011 [digital print on archival paper 158.85cm x 67.5cm] Copyright: Steven Alderton
Steven Alderton, Early Morning at Margaret Olley’s Home 2011 [digital print on archival paper 158.85cm x 67.5cm] Copyright: Steven Alderton

Michael Zavros: ‘Charmer’. The Interview.

Queensland artist Michael Zavros has a new exhibition ‘Charmer’ at Philip Bacon Gallery in Brisbane. Michael was kind enough to speak to me about his new show and lots more…

“SW. You’ve been described as “an aesthete [who] …paints beautiful things beautifully”. Is beauty the (only) subject of your art? Why are these objects not simply decorative?

MZ. The beauty of things does not preclude their intellect or content, for me anyway. I do think it is interesting that beauty is still a pejorative term in contemporary art.”

Read the full interview on The Art Life.

Michael Zavros 'Charmer/Gucci' 2013 oil on canvas 75 x 55cm. Courtesy the artist.
Michael Zavros ‘Charmer/Gucci’ 2013 oil on canvas 75 x 55cm. Courtesy the artist.

The Art of the #Selfie

At the University of Queensland Art Museum, the latest incarnation of the National Artists Self-Portrait Prize: remix.post.connect is now underway. It begs the question,  the internet is “the portrait gallery of the 21st century” why do we need artists?

Read my full post for Guardian Australia.

 

Victoria Reichelt, 1981, 18 x 18cm (1 of 2 parts), 2013, oil on linen (Courtesy of Dianne Tanzer Gallery, Melbourne & Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane)
Victoria Reichelt, 1981, 18 x 18cm (1 of 2 parts), 2013, oil on linen (Courtesy of Dianne Tanzer Gallery, Melbourne & Jan Murphy Gallery, Brisbane)

‘My Country: I Still Call Australia Home’ – Contemporary art from black Australia | A review

“The ‘My Country’ title of the exhibition is derived from the subject matter of much Indigenous art – and perhaps the most common concern for the artists in this show. Curator Bruce McLean has conceived the exhibition over three general areas – My History, My Life, My Country. Despite the thematic approach, the majority of these 300-plus works represent an amalgam of all three themes in one. From the outset the use of ‘My’ in the titles is a political and contextual term. The art displayed is both a reflection and a reinforcement of the social values and beliefs of numerous Indigenous cultures, each with a unique history. We [the non-Indigenous] might call this place ‘Australia’ but it’s worth noting that many Indigenous people consider it a constructed version of nation.”

Read the full review at The Art Life. 

Warwick Thornton, Stranded (still) 2011. 3D digital video: 11:06 minutes, colour, sound.
Warwick Thornton, Stranded (still) 2011. 3D digital video: 11:06 minutes, colour, sound.

[Image courtesy of the artist and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane].

 

An Interview with Richard Bell…

My interview with artist Richard Bell was posted on The Art Life a few months ago but as Richard Bell’s new exhibition “Imagining Victory” is now showing at Artspace in Sydney (until 11 August) I thought I’d repost the link for the full interview in case you missed it.

Richard Bell, Scratch an Aussie, 2008 (Video still). Courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane.
Richard Bell, Scratch an Aussie, 2008 (Video still). Courtesy of the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane.

 

‘After Afghanistan’: An interview with Ben Quilty.

In 2011 Australian artist Ben Quilty was commissioned by The Australian War Memorial to travel to Afghanistan as the official war artist. Quilty spent a month in Afghanistan with the Australian Defence Force (ADF) to record the experiences of defence personnel involved with Operation Slipper. His latest exhibition Ben Quilty: After Afghanistan opens on 20 February at the National Art School in Sydney – where Quilty will be exhibiting 21 studio paintings, and 16 works on paper sketched during his time in Afghanistan.

Sharne Wolff spoke to him about art & war, his recent appointment as a Trustee on the Board of Trustees of the Art Gallery of NSW, and more…read the full interview at The Art Life.

Ben Quilty 'Troy Park After Afghanistan' Oil on linen 190x140cm 2012
Ben Quilty ‘Troy Park After Afghanistan’ Oil on linen 190x140cm 2012

[Image courtesy Ben Quilty, artist].

Inward & Outward: A review of the 7th Asia Pacific Triennial [APT7]

The 7th Asia Pacific Triennial runs until 14 April 2013 at the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane, Australia.

“APT7 feels more like the future than the past … The exhibition illustrates the way Australia grapples with its sense of belonging in the Asia Pacific microworld. The denseness of this show, however, suggests that the question of how we resolve our place has become even more complex. The weaving together of work by so many artists means national borders become blurred and what emerges are our similarities and not our differences. APT7 recommends we turn our gaze both inward and outward. If you’ve never been to QAGOMA then maybe it’s time you went”.

Read the full review at The Art Life.

Sangdon Kim (South Korea) b.1973 Bulwang-dong Totem [blue] 2012 Giclee prints on premium lustre paper, ed. 2/5
[Courtesy the artist and the Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art].

Everything I Want to be When I Grow Up…

“In 2010 Borland gathered together some props and rang a couple of friends to shoot the images for Smudge. She prepares beforehand although the dressing up and poses are playful and usually quite spontaneous. Although it’s not really evident from the photos, one of her subjects was her good friend, Nick Cave, who apparently doesn’t like to have his photo taken. Borland told him she was interested in his shape and angular features and not his celebrity, or his face…”

Read the full review of photographer Polly Borland’s exhibition Everything I Want to be When I Grow Up at The Art Life.

Polly Borland, Untitled (Nick cave in a blue wig) 2010, type C photograph
210 x 160 cm approx

[Image reproduced courtesy of the artist © Polly Borland and Murray White Room, Melbourne].

Art on the Heysen Trail…

The Heysen Trail is a long distance walking trail in South Australia. It runs for an incredible 1200 kilometres from the Parachilna Gorge in the Flinders Ranges to Cape Jervis on South Australia’s Fleurieu Peninsula. A couple of weeks ago I flew to Adelaide for the first time to walk part of the Heysen Trail with a group of friends. Although I shouldn’t admit it here it never occurred to me that the Heysen Trail had anything whatsoever to do with Hans Heysen (1877-1968), well-known South Australian colonial artist. It turned out this trip would immerse me in art…

Read the full story at The Art Life.

River red gums. Heysen Trail, South Australia